Do you have your tickets to the Old Northwood Historic Home Tour? #ilovewpb

The Old Northwood Historic District in West Palm Beach—bounded by Broadway, North Dixie Highway and 26th and 35th Streets—contains 320 historic buildings and is one of the first historic Districts to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This year’s tour will be held on Sunday, December 16 from 5 pm— 9 pm. Tickets are the same price as last year $35.00. Check-in is located at 3510 Spruce ave, WPB FL 33407 starting at 3:30 pm 

The Candlelight Home Tour is an annual event that began thirty years ago and draws over 1,400 people to visit the historic homes in this unique neighborhood and share wine and conversation with friends and neighbors. The Old Northwood District includes homes in the Mission, Mediterranean Revival, Frame and Mid-Century Vernacular styles, designed in the 1920’s by leading architects.

This year we are offering the tatse of Northwood in place of a VIP party. The Taste of Northwood Experience will take you on a guided walking tour of Northwood Village along the way our guide will enlighten you with our history and a story or 2 about how the area was first founded.

Get tickets here

Cheat Sheet to the 2019 Best of Palm Beach County

Palm Beach Post is doing a BEST of Palm Beach County competition. Nominations go through November 16th, and if  you nominate 25 businesses, you will be in the running to win $500!

It’s easy to do. Simply choose a category, make your nomination, and fill in your email address. Continue and complete the registration form*. Afterwards, you’ll receive a confirmation email which will contain a link that will allows you to auto login each day to nominate again if you wish. *You MUST register in order to vote!

Here are my picks! There are plenty more to choose from – Click here and make your selections.

Beauty & Health

  • Barber Shop: Goodfellas Barbershop
  • Best Spa/Medical Spa: Kaffee’s Garden Spa
  • Chiropractor: Dr. Jose Llorens / Power Chiropractic
  • Dentist: Dr. Sergey Korol
  • Hair Salon: Prado Spa and Salon
  • Orthodontist: Scott A. Mccranels

Clothing

  • Local Women’s Clothing: City Girls Consignment

Dining

  • All-Around Restaurant: Table 26
  • Bakery: Ganache Bakery Cafe
  • BBQ: Off Tha Bone BBQ
  • Breakfast: Dontees Diner
  • Brunch: E.R. Bradley’s
  • Burger: Grease
  • Business Lunch: Avocado Grill
  • Cuban Restaurant: Don Ramon’s
  • Cuban Sandwich: Havana’s
  • Diner: Howleys
  • Doughnuts: Cider Donuts
  • Fine Dining: La Sirena
  • Fried Chicken: Bay Bay’s Chicken & Waffles
  • Greek Food: Souvlaki Grill
  • Indian Food: Taste of India
  • Italian Food: Lynora’s
  • Local Coffee Shop: Subculture Coffee
  • Mexican Food: Rocco’s Tacos
  • Outdoor Dining: Darbster
  • Pizza: Pizza Girls
  • Sandwich Shop: Aioli
  • Sushi: Kabuki
  • Thai Food: Malakor Thai

Entertainment & Leisure

  • Art Gallery: The Box Gallery
  • Bowling: Verdes Tropical
  • Concert Venue: Respectable Street Cafe
  • Dance Studio: Florida Dance Conservatory
  • Live Theatre: Palm Beach Dramaworks
  • Place to Go Dancing: Banko Cantina
  • Boat Clubs: Palm Beach Sailing Club

Kids & Education

  • Karate School: Bonsai Dojo Karate Club
  • Local College: Palm Beach Atlantic
  • Private School: Global Prospective School
  • Public School: Suncoast High School

People & Places

  • Green Company: Vinyasun: Home Solar Energy Installation Company
  • Hotel: Hilton West Palm Beach
  • Museum: Flagler Museum
  • Local Tourist Attraction: West Palm Beach Food Tours
  • Wedding Venue: West Palm Beach Waterfront
  • Local Tourist Attraction:
  • Person of the Year: Ricky Aiken

Services

  • Car Wash: Rubber Ducky
  • Non Profit: InnerCity Innovators
  • Pet Boarding: Posh Pet Hotel
  • Photographer: Capehart Photography
  • Veterinarian: Shores Animal Clinic

Shopping

  • Antique Store: Churchill Galleries
  • Boutique: Coastal Girls Co.
  • Florist: Flower and Fringe
  • Furniture: Heath & Company
  • Grocery: Don Victorio
  • Garden Center: Amelia’s SmartyPlants
  • Lawn Equipment: Uncle Bim’s Garden Center
  • Local Hardware Store: Hall’s Hardware
  • Local Jewelry Store: Provident Jewelry

Spirits

  • Craft Beer: West Palm Brewery
  • Happy Hour: Hullabaloo
  • Sports Bar: Duffy’s Sports Grill

Did you do it? Here’s that link again!

Okeechobee and the Pedestrian Overpass option

I just got back from a campaign event where the discussion turned to the much requested overpass on Okeechobee Blvd. The comment was made that “the Mayor didn’t even consider it” (paraphrasing).

During the Okeechobee Corridor study a few years ago my group discussed the overpass option in  depth. We discussed different ways that we could make an overpass work to not just provide and end to end crossing from the convention center to CityPlace, but also provide options for people coming from CityPlace South Tower as well as those who are trying to cross Okeechobee at Parker.

The concept of not just having a boring (smelly) overpass, but creating a new space was what excited me. A destination, something like the highline in New York that could provide more than just getting across the road.

I was happy when the final Okeechobee Corridor Study was released, there was a section that discussed the various options, the costs included as well as the reasons why the city was not recommending the overpass.

Below are the options the study worked through – commentary on the images is mine.

This is what most people think when they talk about an over pass. Turns out elevators are expensive. (length: 310 ft, price: $7,000,000) 
Interesting option, provides an “on ramp” for neighborhood access from Grandview Heights, and “off ramps” at Cityplace, Hilton, Kravis Center. (length: 2125ft,  cost: 49,800,000)
I liked this one. the Organic look could make it both a functional way of getting around as well as a featured piece of art. (length: 2125, cost: 49,800,000)
At over half a mile, this is by far the most ambitious. Not a huge fan of the square shape, but of we knocked off some of the edges make an interesting above ground running track. (length: 3000ft, cost:70,000,000)
City’s Cost Estimates – Not Cheap

Here is the full explanation of why the Okeechobee study is not recommending the pedestrian bridge. Emphasis is mine.

Several ideas for pedestrian bridges have been proposed over the years along Okeechobee. They were also mentioned frequently at the Okeechobee charrette. When they were mentioned at the charrette, the expressed goal was to allow safer and more convenient crossings.

People who might benefit from bridges include visitors and convention attendees as well as residents from adjacent buildings and neighborhoods.

Several bridge concepts where tested. For pedestrian bridges, there are two options. One option includes elevators and a bridge. This option can have a smaller footprint, but requires people to use an elevator to access the bridge. The second option is to use ramps to access the bridge. Ramps add length to the bridge crossing and expand the overall footprint of the bridge.

The bridge and elevator option would be able to provide the most direct crossing between the convention center and CityPlace. The free-flow movement of pedestrians is restricted with this option by the capacity and speed of the elevators. This option would not be able to handle large volumes of people over short periods of time, such as when a convention center event ends. The elevator wait times may also be equal or greater to the existing time it takes to cross the intersection at Rosemary and Okeechobee.

The ramp options require longer bridge lengths in order to make the crossing across Okeechobee.

These options can handle larger volumes of people but require longer distances and more time for people walking to cross the street. They also require a larger footprint.

To estimate the cost of the pedestrian bridge options, the Orlando Convention Center pedestrian bridge across International Drive was used. The bridge has some similarities in context, including crossing a multi-lane roadway and at a convention center.

Orlando Convention Center Pedestrian Bridge – so ugly.

The costs range from $7 to $70 million. The $7 million cost would be for the bridge option with elevators. This cost represents 25% of the estimated cost to rebuild the entire Okeechobee corridor from I-95 to Flagler Drive. The ramp options range from $50 to $70 million. These costs represent between 180% and 260% of the cost to rebuild the entire Okeechobee corridor from I-95 to Flagler Drive.

Because of the crossing needs across Okeechobee, the safety issues, and the costs, a pedestrian bridge across Okeechobee is not recommended at this time. As a first step, it is recommended that the corridor be redesigned and rebuilt to improve conditions at existing intersections. None of the bridge options improve the underlying safety issues for all corridor users. Redesigning the street and intersection can do this. Additionally, none of the bridge options are able to handle high volumes of pedestrian crossings or reduce crossing time.

Whether or not you agree with the conclusions, that is up to you. But the study was done, and the options were looked at and evaluated.

To read the full Okeechobee Blvd Study please click here. It’s very interesting and on such an important topic.

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